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Active and Adaptive Materials
October 22nd and 23rd 2015, ASRC

Invited Speakers:

Samuel Stupp

Samuel I Stupp

Northwestern University

Samuel Stupp obtained his B.S. in chemistry at the University of California at Los Angeles and his Ph.D. in materials science and engineering at Northwestern University. After 18 years at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign he joined in 1999 the faculty at Northwestern as Board of Trustees Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Chemistry, Medicine, and Biomedical Engineering. He is currently the Director of Northwestern's Simpson Querrey Institute for BioNanotechnology and of the Center for Bio-Inspired Energy Science. Professor Stupp is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Spanish Royal Academy. He is also a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Materials Research Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the World Technology Network, and the World Biomaterials Congress. His awards include, the Department of Energy Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Materials Chemistry, Humboldt Senior Award from Germany, the Materials Research Society Medal Award, the American Chemical Society Award in Polymer Chemistry, the Sir Edward Youde Memorial Award in Hong Kong, the American Chemical Society Ronald Breslow Award for Achievement in Biomimetic Chemistry, the International Award from The Society of Polymer Science in Japan, and Honorary Doctorates from Eindhoven University in the Netherlands, University of Gothenburg in Sweden, and the National University of Costa Rica. His research is focused on materials for medicine and energy using self-assembly strategies and supramolecular chemistry.

Lee Cronin

Lee Cronin

Glasgow University

Lee Cronin FRSE. Professional Career: 2013-Regius Professor of Chemistry. Alexander von Humboldt research fellow (Uni. of Bielefeld); 1997-1999: Research fellow (Uni. of Edinburgh); 1997: Ph.D. Bio-Inorganic Chemistry, Uni. of York; 1994 BSc. Chemistry, First Class, Uni. of York. Prizes include 2013 BP/RSE Hutton Prize, 2012 RSC Corday Morgan, 2011 RSC Bob Hay Lectureship, a Wolfson-Royal Society Merit Award in 2009, Election to the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 2009. The focus of Cronin's work is understanding and controlling self-assembly and self- organisation in Chemistry to develop functional molecular and nano-molecular chemical systems (including solar fuel systems); linking architectural design with function and recently engineering system-level functions (e.g. coupled catalytic self-assembly, emergence of inorganic materials and fabrication of inorganic cells that allow complex cooperative behaviours). Much of this work is converging on exploring the assembly and engineering of emergent chemical systems aiming towards 'inorganic biology'. This work has been presented in over 300 papers and 250 lectures worldwide. It is also worth pointing out that the expertise in the Cronin group (which numbers over 50 people and > £10 M in funding) is unique bringing together inorganic / synthetic chemists, chemical engineers, complex system modelling, evolutionary theory, robotics and AI.

Jan van Esch

Jan van Esch

Delft University of Technology

Jan H van Esch is professor of chemistry at the Department of Chemical Engineering of the University of Delft, and he is chairing the Advanced Soft Matter group. He is a supramolecular and physical organic chemistry scientist from the dutch Nolte school (PhD), and did postdoctoral stays with Helmut Ringsdorf and Ben Feringa. His research focusses on directed self-assembly and far-from-equilibrium phenomena in molecular systems, and to exploit such systems in smart materials and biomedical applications. Over the years he has achieved several breakthroughs in molecular self-assembly, for instance the design of functional molecular gelators (a.o. Angew. Chem. 1999, 2004), chiral memory effects in a light-switchable self-assembling system (Science 2004), orthogonal self-assembly (JACS 2003 and Angew. Chem. 2008), fuel-driven disspative self-assembly (Angew. Chem. 2010, Science 2015), and catalytic control of self-assembly (Nature Chem. 2013). One class of molecular hydrogelators invented by him and his coworkers is now being commercialized for biomedical applications. He is recipient of fellowships of the Humboldt Foundation and the Netherlands Academy of Science, and a prestigious VICI grant from the Netherlands Foundation of Scientific Research. Amongst other activities, he is board member of the Royal Dutch Chemical Society, coordinator of an FP7 european training network SMARTNET, and MT member of the european COST action "Emergence and evolution of complex chemical systems".

David G. Lynn

David G. Lynn

Emory University

David G. Lynn has contributed in the general areas of molecular recognition, synthetic biology and chemical evolution, and has developed chemical and physical methods for the analysis of supramolecular self-assemblies, of signal transduction in cellular development and pathogenesis, of molecular skeletons for storing and reading information, and of the evolution of biological order. After a fellowship at Columbia University and teaching briefly at the University of Virginia and Cornell University, he served as Professor of Chemistry at the University of Chicago until 2000. In that year he moved to accept the Asa Griggs Candler Professorship in Chemistry and Biology at Emory University. In 2002, Lynn was awarded one of 20 inaugural Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professorships and the 2011 Emory Scholar Teacher Award for pioneering several science/arts collaborations for communicating science. He was appointed Chair of the Department of Chemistry in 2006, as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2011, and as the ACS Herty Awardee in 2013.

Elisa Riedo

Elisa Riedo

CUNY ASRC

Professor Elisa Riedo received her B.S. in Physics from the University of Milano, Italy in 1995 with Summa Cum Laude. In 2000, she received her Ph.D. in Physics in a joint program between the University of Milano and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. For four years, she has been a Post Doctoral Fellow at the EPFL in Lausanne working on the origin of nanoscopic friction. Since 2003, she was a faculty member of the School of Physics of the Georgia Institute of Technology, before joining The City University of New York Advanced Science Research Center with a faculty position as Professor of Physics at The City College of New York in the summer of 2015. She is the director of the picoForce Laboratory, which develops new scanning probe microscopy based methods to study the properties of materials at the nanoscale and for nanomanufacturing advanced nano-materials. In 2013, Dr. Riedo was elected APS Fellow, in the Division of Condensed Matter Physics, for her atomic force microscopy studies of nanoscale friction, liquid structure and nanotube elasticity, and the invention of thermochemical nanolithography.

Nathan Gianneschi

Nathan Gianneschi

UC San Diego

Nathan C. Gianneschi received his B.Sc(Hons) at the University of Adelaide in 1999 with a thesis under the auspices of Dr. Louis M. Rendina in organometallic chemistry. In 2005 he completed his Ph.D at Northwestern University with Prof. Chad A. Mirkin studying synthetic allosteric catalysts as mimics of enzymes. Following a Dow Chemical postdoctoral fellowship at The Scripps Research Institute with Prof. M. Reza Ghadiri, in 2008 he joined the University of California, San Diego where he is an Associate Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering. The Gianneschi group takes an interdisciplinary approach to nanomaterials research with a focus on multifunctional materials with interests that include biomedical applications, programmed interactions with biomolecules and cells, and basic research into nanoscale materials design, synthesis and characterization. For this work Prof. Gianneschi has been awarded the NIH Director's New Innovator Award, the NIH Director's Transformative Research Award and the White House's highest honor for young scientists and engineers with a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). Prof. Gianneschi was awarded a Dreyfus Foundation New Faculty Award, is a Kavli Fellow of the National Academy of Sciences, and is an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellow.

Adam Braunschweig

Adam Braunschweig

University of Miami

Professor Adam B. Braunschweig earned his B.A in chemistry from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in organic chemistry at the University of California Los Angeles. He carried out postdoctoral research at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and as a NIH NRSA postdoctoral researcher at Northwestern University. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Miami, whose research interests include artificial photosynthesis, nanolithography, and carbohydrate nanotechnology.

Paul Chaikin

Paul Chaikin

New York University

Paul Chaikin is a Silver Professor of Physics at NYU and co-founder of the Center for Soft Matter Research. He is a condensed matter experimentalist with interests in both soft and hard matter systems. Current research includes: artificial systems that self –replicate and evolve, self-assembly and self-organization, active matter and driven systems, nanolithography with diblock copolymers, photonic non-crystals and low dimensional conductors and superconductors.

Previous positions included professorships in Physics at UCLA, the University of Pennsylvania, and Princeton University where he is the Henry DeWolf Smyth Professor of Physics Emeritus. He has been a consultant at NEC Research, Solvay, MARS, and is a long time consultant at Exxon Research.

He received his B. S. in Physics from Caltech in 1966 and PhD in Physics from the University of Pennsylvania in 1971. He is an elected fellow of the American Physical Society (1984), the Institute of Physics (London) (2004), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2003) and a member of the National Academy of Science (2004).

His honors include: Sloan, Guggenheim and Rothschild-Mayent Fellowships, the 2009 World Technology Award for Materials, and lectureships at Harvard (Loeb), Toronto (Welsh), UC London (Bragg) and Oxford (Hinshelwood) among others.

Andreas Walther

Andreas Walther

Aachen University

Andreas Walther graduated from Bayreuth University in Germany in 2008 with a Ph.D. focusing on the self-assembly behavior and applications of Janus particles and other soft, complex colloids. After a postdoctoral stay with a focus on biomimetic hybrid materials at Aalto University (Helsinki, Finland), he returned to Germany and established his independent research group at the DWI - Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials in Aachen. His research interests concentrate on developing and understanding hierarchical self-assembly concepts inside and outside equilibrium, and on utilizing and connecting such processes to soft materials research - often following bioinspired design principles. A. Walther has published more than 100 papers and has recently been awarded the Bayer Early Excellence in Science Award and the Reimund Stadler Young Investigator Award of the German Chemical Society.

Stoyan Smoukov

Stoyan Smoukov

University of Cambridge

Stoyan Smoukov is the Head of the Active and Intelligent Materials group in the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy at the University of Cambridge, where he has been since 2012. He is leading the work on an ERC grant EMATTER, as well as several industrial collaborations. He is the author of 51 journal papers, cited over 1450 times, with H-index of 18.

He received M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Physical/Analytical chemistry at Northwestern University. His post-doctoral work was at the Illinois Institute of Technology and Northwestern University in the departments of Chemical Engineering. He then joined the group of Prof. Orlin Velev in North Carolina State University, first as Visiting Assistant Professor, and then as Research Assistant Professor. There he worked on reconfigurable assembly and disassembly of magnetic Janus particles. A novel method for fabricating bulk amounts of inexpensive nanofibers, he co-developed at NCSU, has been spun off into a successful startup company.

Stoyan Smoukov's current research interests are focused on fundamental investigations of multi-responsive materials, materials in confinement, as well as the use of geometry and processing technologies for achieving responsiveness.


Sponsor: Soft Matter Sponsor: Nature Nanotechnology Sponsor: Materials Horizons Sponsor: Perkin Elmer Sponsor: Chem by Cell Press Sponsor: Journal of Applied Polymer Science Sponsor: NYC Skeptics Sponsor: Advanced Science

Grant funding provided by Army Research Office
Sponsor: Army Research Office